the heterosexual lifestyle is looking around you and seeing your relationships mirrored constantly, assuring you that you’re doing it right, that you have something to shoot for

thousands of adverts of people like you getting married, having kids, getting a house, a car, fucking home insurance. all that capitalist shit.

magazines, flyers, books, films, newspaper dedicated to you and the endless permutations of a cis man and women finally getting together

big fuck off signs of you being sexual with one another and nobody bats an eyelid. 

children constantly being told they have ‘little girlfriends’ or ‘little boyfriends’ depending on their gender, they’re assumed to be straight from the get-go. 

sex education completely centred around not getting pregnant through penetration by your cis male partner in the missionary position

i’m SO BORED it makes me want to scream. everywhere i look nothing nothing nothing like me or what i want to be.

i’m not a man or a woman. i’m not straight. i don’t want to get married. i don’t want to have kids. i don’t want any of it.

QUIT SHOVING IT DOWN MY THROAT.

you’ve got no idea how that feels. how can you have the NERVE to complain? 

Most men never think about patriarchy—what it means, how it is created and sustained. Many men in our nation would not be able to spell the word or pronounce it correctly. The word “patriarchy” just is not a part of their normal everyday thought or speech. Men who have heard and know the word usually associate it with women’s liberation, with feminism, and therefore dismiss it as irrelevant to their own experiences. I have been standing at podiums talking about patriarchy for more than thirty years. It is a word I use daily, and men who hear me use it often ask me what I mean by it.

Nothing discounts the old antifeminist projection of men as all-powerful more than their basic ignorance of a major facet of the political system that shapes and informs male identity and sense of self from birth until death.

bell hooks, “Understanding Patriachy” (via heteroglossia)
good motivation

good motivation

theuppitynegras:

whitegirlsaintshit:

america-wakiewakie:

Princeton Concludes What Kind of Government America Really Has, and It’s Not a Democracy | PolicyMic 
The news: A new scientific study from Princeton researchers Martin Gilens and Benjamin I. Page has finally put some science behind the recently popular argument that the United States isn’t a democracy any more. And they’ve found that in fact, America is basically an oligarchy.
An oligarchy is a system where power is effectively wielded by a small number of individuals defined by their status called oligarchs. Members of the oligarchy are the rich, the well connected and the politically powerful, as well as particularly well placed individuals in institutions like banking and finance or the military.
For their study, Gilens and Page compiled data from roughly 1,800 different policy initiatives in the years between 1981 and 2002. They then compared those policy changes with the expressed opinion of the United State public. Comparing the preferences of the average American at the 50th percentile of income to what those Americans at the 90th percentile preferred, as well as the opinions of major lobbying or business groups, the researchers found out that the government followed the directives set forth by the latter two much more often.
It’s beyond alarming. As Gilens and Page write, “the preferences of the average American appear to have only a minuscule, near-zero, statistically non-significant impact upon public policy.” In other words, their statistics say your opinion literally does not matter.
That might explain why mandatory background checks on gun sales supported by 83% to 91% of Americans aren’t in place, or why Congress has taken no action on greenhouse gas emissions even when such legislation is supported by the vast majority of citizens.
This problem has been steadily escalating for four decades. While there are some limitations to their data set, economists Thomas Piketty and Emmanuel Saez constructed income statistics based on IRS data that go back to 1913. They found that the gap between the ultra-wealthy and the rest of us is much bigger than you would think…
(Read Full Text)

I said this when I was in fucking ninth grade and wrote a twelve paged paper on it and my teacher told me that I was a conspiracy theorist and that I needed a realistic topic. ok.

I highkey was saying this all along

no shit.

theuppitynegras:

whitegirlsaintshit:

america-wakiewakie:

Princeton Concludes What Kind of Government America Really Has, and It’s Not a Democracy | PolicyMic 

The news: A new scientific study from Princeton researchers Martin Gilens and Benjamin I. Page has finally put some science behind the recently popular argument that the United States isn’t a democracy any more. And they’ve found that in fact, America is basically an oligarchy.

An oligarchy is a system where power is effectively wielded by a small number of individuals defined by their status called oligarchs. Members of the oligarchy are the rich, the well connected and the politically powerful, as well as particularly well placed individuals in institutions like banking and finance or the military.

For their study, Gilens and Page compiled data from roughly 1,800 different policy initiatives in the years between 1981 and 2002. They then compared those policy changes with the expressed opinion of the United State public. Comparing the preferences of the average American at the 50th percentile of income to what those Americans at the 90th percentile preferred, as well as the opinions of major lobbying or business groups, the researchers found out that the government followed the directives set forth by the latter two much more often.

It’s beyond alarming. As Gilens and Page write, “the preferences of the average American appear to have only a minuscule, near-zero, statistically non-significant impact upon public policy.” In other words, their statistics say your opinion literally does not matter.

That might explain why mandatory background checks on gun sales supported by 83% to 91% of Americans aren’t in place, or why Congress has taken no action on greenhouse gas emissions even when such legislation is supported by the vast majority of citizens.

This problem has been steadily escalating for four decades. While there are some limitations to their data set, economists Thomas Piketty and Emmanuel Saez constructed income statistics based on IRS data that go back to 1913. They found that the gap between the ultra-wealthy and the rest of us is much bigger than you would think…

(Read Full Text)

I said this when I was in fucking ninth grade and wrote a twelve paged paper on it and my teacher told me that I was a conspiracy theorist and that I needed a realistic topic. ok.

I highkey was saying this all along

no shit.

Key points to remember:

  • Abuse grows from attitudes and values, not feelings. The roots are ownership, the trunk is entitlement, and the branches are control.
  • Abuse and respect are opposites. Abusers cannot change unless they overcome their core disrespect toward their partners.
  • Abusers are far more conscious of what they are doing than they appear to be. However, even their less-conscious behaviors are driven by their core attitudes.
  • Abusers are unwilling to be nonabusive, not unable. They do not want to give up power and control.
  • You are not crazy. Trust your perceptions of how your abusive partner treats you and thinks about you.
Lundy Bancroft in Why Does He Do That? Inside the Minds of Angry and Controlling Men (2002), p. 240 (via mikroblogolas)
me and mel b have that in common

me and mel b have that in common


literature meme | two of two movements | the harlem renaissance
the harlem renaissance (c. 1918–37)  was a blossoming of african american culture, particularly in the creative arts, and the most influential movement in african american literary history. embracing literary, musical, theatrical, and visual arts, participants sought to reconceptualize “the negro” apart from the white stereotypes that had influenced black peoples’ relationship to their heritage and to each other. they also sought to break free of victorian moral values and bourgeois shame about aspects of their lives that might, as seen by whites, reinforce racist beliefs. with much of the literature focusing on a realistic portrayal of black life, conservative black critics feared that the depiction of ghetto realism would impede the cause of racial equality. the intent of the movement, however, was not political but aesthetic. any benefit a burgeoning black contribution to literature might have in defraying racial prejudice was secondary to, as langston hughes put it, the “expression of our individual dark-skinned selves.”
the nucleus of the movement included jean toomer, langston hughes, rudolf fisher, wallace thurman, jessie redmon fauset, nella larsen, arna bontemps, countee cullen, and zora neale hurston. an older generation of writers and intellectuals—james weldon johnson, claude mckay, alain locke, and charles s. johnson—served as mentors.
the harlem renaissance influenced future generations of black writers, but it was largely ignored by the literary establishment after it waned in the 1930s. with the advent of the civil rights movement, it again acquired wider recognition. never dominated by a particular school of thought but rather characterized by intense debate, the movement laid the groundwork for all later african american literature (like that of gwendolyn brooks and robert hayden) and had an enormous impact on subsequent black literature and consciousness worldwide.
(clockwise from the top left: zora neale hurston, anne spencer, jean toomer, langston hughes, arna bontemps, and gwendolyn brooks)

literature meme | two of two movements | the harlem renaissance

the harlem renaissance (c. 1918–37)  was a blossoming of african american culture, particularly in the creative arts, and the most influential movement in african american literary history. embracing literary, musical, theatrical, and visual arts, participants sought to reconceptualize “the negro” apart from the white stereotypes that had influenced black peoples’ relationship to their heritage and to each other. they also sought to break free of victorian moral values and bourgeois shame about aspects of their lives that might, as seen by whites, reinforce racist beliefs. with much of the literature focusing on a realistic portrayal of black life, conservative black critics feared that the depiction of ghetto realism would impede the cause of racial equality. the intent of the movement, however, was not political but aesthetic. any benefit a burgeoning black contribution to literature might have in defraying racial prejudice was secondary to, as langston hughes put it, the “expression of our individual dark-skinned selves.”

the nucleus of the movement included jean toomer, langston hughes, rudolf fisher, wallace thurman, jessie redmon fauset, nella larsen, arna bontemps, countee cullen, and zora neale hurston. an older generation of writers and intellectuals—james weldon johnson, claude mckay, alain locke, and charles s. johnson—served as mentors.

the harlem renaissance influenced future generations of black writers, but it was largely ignored by the literary establishment after it waned in the 1930s. with the advent of the civil rights movement, it again acquired wider recognition. never dominated by a particular school of thought but rather characterized by intense debate, the movement laid the groundwork for all later african american literature (like that of gwendolyn brooks and robert hayden) and had an enormous impact on subsequent black literature and consciousness worldwide.

(clockwise from the top left: zora neale hurston, anne spencer, jean toomer, langston hughes, arna bontemps, and gwendolyn brooks)

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